When you got married, it was under the impression that you’d be with your spouse for the rest of your life. You put a lot of effort into your marriage. You shared in the expenses that were accrued and even helped your spouse as they went through school. You were as supportive as you could be, which is why it was such a shock when your spouse decided that they wanted to get a divorce.

While training at the new, higher-paying job that their schooling allowed for, they met someone. Now, you’re shocked that you won’t be the one to benefit from all the schooling that you paid for. What can you do? Can you ask for that money back in the divorce?

You might want to seek spousal support

Spousal support could be one answer to your questions. Spousal support is generally provided to a lesser-earning spouse who needs financial support to support the same kind of lifestyle that they currently have (within reason). For example, if your spouse is now earning $100,000 per year and you make only $50,000, then the court could ask your spouse to give you support to make up some of that difference while you focus on your career, going back to school or just try to get back on your feet. Spousal support is usually temporary, which is something to keep in mind.

You may want to ask for repayment during property division negotiations

Another option is to ask for repayment when you negotiate for property. Your spouse may give you a greater portion of your marital assets as a kind of repayment or pay you out in cash or liquid assets.

Your attorney will help you negotiate if you’d like to try to get that money back in any way.